Mail-enable already created distribution group.

Today I had an AD administrator create a distribution group and add all the members to it in Active Directory.  They needed it enabled in Exchange so I thought easy just go into the EAC (Exchange Administrative Center) and add an existing group.  This was the case in Exchange 2007 and 2010 but not in 2013.  In order to add an existing group so you don’t have to recreate it from the EAC and add all the users back you go into EMC (Exchange Management Console).  Then once in Powershell type in the command belowmail-enable.

Enable-DistributionGroup -Identity “groupnameinAD” -Alias “groupname”
-DisplayName “displayname"

 

 

Creating a scheduled task without being administrator

Good morning, I was working on a scheduled task that would run on a user’s PC and start a particular application when the user logged into their machine and it had to run as the user in particular logging in.  What I discovered was that if the user wasn’t administrator on the box I would get an access denied in both PowerShell and schtasks.

scheduledtask

What I figured out was that if you choose to run the task at logon (I assume this probably applies to at startup as well) it requires administrative rights but if you schedule the task as an hourly, daily, weekly, etc. task it doesn’t require administrative rights to create it.  Now this requires that what the task is running itself doesn’t need administrative rights but in my case it does not.

scheduledtask2

Now you may be asking yourself why didn’t he simply create a scheduled task through group policy.  Well, the reason for that is I wanted it to target a specific computer collection in SCCM that targeted only laptops.  I could have done it with a GPO and even filtered the GPO with WMI filtering and accomplished the same thing but the application is pushed out through SCCM and I wanted everything that went with it targeted to that collection.  Maybe slightly more work on my part but good to know nonetheless.